Reporting diseases

Beekeepers must report notifiable diseases

For all beekeepers

This is already a legislated requirement in all states and territories and is included in the Code of Practice as reinforcement.

Data on how prevalent diseases are in particular areas is extremely useful in both managing these diseases in areas where they are present and in stopping them from spreading. This data is also required to support trade between states and internationally.

Each state and territory has differing requirements in this section of the Code of Practice.

REQUIREMENT
2.1 A beekeeper must report the detection or suspicion of any notifiable disease to their relevant state or territory authority by the quickest practicable means. Verbal reports should be followed up in writing (for example, by e-mail, text message (SMS), fax or letter).
2.2 A beekeeper must have knowledge of the pests and diseases that are notifiable diseases in the state or territory where their hives are located.

Notifiable pests and diseases

The following pests and diseases are notifiable in all states and territories:

Notifiable pests and diseases listed by state or territory

Victoria

Small hive beetle (Aethina tumida)*
Nosemosis (Nosema apis and N. ceranae)
Braula fly (Braula coeca)
Chalkbrood (Ascosphaera apis)
Africanised honey bee
Asian honey bee (Apis cerana)**
Dwarf honey bee (Apis florea)**
Giant honey bee (Apis dorsata)**

*will be removed from the notifiable pest list as of December 2016.
**In October 2015 was recommended to be included in the revised Livestock Disease Control Regulations

Northern Territory

Small hive beetle (Aethina tumida)
Wax moth (Galleria mellonella and Achroia grisella)
Nosemosis (Nosema apis and N. ceranae)
Braula fly (Braula coeca)
Chalkbrood (Ascosphaera apis)
Sacbrood virus
Africanised honey bee
Cape honey bee (Apis mellifera capensis)
Asian honey bee (Apis cerana)
Colony collapse disorder

Queensland

Braula fly (Braula coeca)
Africanised honey bee
Asian honey bee (Apis cerana)
Dwarf honey bee (Apis florea)
Giant honey bee (Apis dorsata)
Bumble bee (Bombus spp.)

Note: European foulbrood (Melisococcus plutonis) is not notifiable in Queensland.

South Australia

Braula fly (Braula coeca)
Africanised honey bee
Asian honey bee (Apis cerana)
Acute bee paralysis

New South Wales

Small hive beetle (Aethina tumida)*
Nosemosis (Nosema apis and N. ceranae)
Braula fly (Braula coeca)
Chalkbrood (Ascosphaera apis)
Africanised honey bee
Asian honey bee (Apis cerana)
Dwarf honey bee (Apis florea and A. andreniformis)
Giant honey bee (Apis dorsata, A. laboriosa and A. breviligula)

*Small hive beetle is now endemic in New South Wales and is likely to be removed from the notifiable pest list in the future.

Australian Capital Territory

Braula fly (Braula coeca)
Africanised honey bee
Asian honey bee (Apis cerana)
Dwarf honey bee (Apis florea and A. andreniformis)
Giant honey bee (Apis dorsata, A. laboriosa and A. breviligula)

Western Australia

Small hive beetle (Aethina tumida)
Wax moth (Galleria mellonella and Achroia grisella)
Nosemosis (Nosema ceranae only)
Braula fly (Braula coeca)
Chalkbrood (Ascophaera apis)
Sacbrood virus
Black queen cell virus
Large hive beetle (Oplostomus fuligineus)
Africanised honey bee
Cape honey bee (Apis mellifera capensis)
Asian honey bee (Apis cerana)
Dwarf honey bee (Apis florea only)
Giant honey bee (Apis dorsata only)

Note 1: In Victoria and in the ACT only one species of Tropilaelaps, T. clareae, is a notifiable exotic. However, given T. mercedesae’s similar appearance to T. clareae and other parasitic mites, all exotic mites detected should still be reported.

Note 2: Some states only list one species of dwarf and/or giant honey bees as notifiable. This is most likely due to the low likelihood of these other species entering Australia. The lesser known species of dwarf and giant honey bee will be very difficult to distinguish from the better known ones, and will have just as much potential to be carrying exotic pests or diseases. ALL exotic species (and subspecies of A. mellifera) of honey bee should be considered as notifiable and reported if they are detected.


Download the Code

Australian Honey Bee Industry Biosecurity Code of Practice